15Aug 2017

EFFECT OF SNAGS TECHNIQUE ON HEART RATE AMONG PATIENTS WITH UPPER CERVICAL DYSFUNCTION.

  • Department Of Physiotherapy, SardarBhagwan Singh Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Research HNB Garhwal University, Dehradun.
  • Professor, Department Of Physiotherapy, SardarBhagwan Singh Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Research HNB Garhwal University, Dehradun.
  • MPT,PhD, Associate Professor Department of Physiotherapy, SardarBhagwan Singh Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Research HNB Garhwal University, Dehradun).
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Background: Cervical spine dysfunction may lead to misalignment most commonly of upper cervical joint complex especially the atlas.Many vital structures pass through the upper cervical joint complex, upper cervical joint complex, one of the most important being the vagus nerve. Any misalignment of atlas vertebra in the upper cervical joint complex leads to effect on vagal action which consequently does not carry out its function of antagonist to the sympathetic system properly, causing increased heart rate. Mulligan\'s mobilization techniques are thought to increase the range of motion as well as correct the alignment of spine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SNAGS technique on heart rate among patients with upper cervical dysfunction with vagus nerve impingement. Methodology: 80 subjects participated in the study. Heart rate was taken as an outcome measure which was recorded prior to SNAGs technique given to the patient?s atlas vertebrae to side it was stuck. The HR was compared with the post intervention HR. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the variables. Paired T Test was used to see the effects of intervention on heart rate in our study population Result: There was reduction in heart rate by 5.2 beats/min following SNAGs technique which was found to be highly significant (p ˂ 0.001) statistically. Conclusion: The study concluded that SNAGS technique was effective in correcting the impingement caused to vagus nerve as measured through HR in patients with upper cervical dysfunction.


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[Mitali Babulkar BPT, Maneesh Arora and Parul Raj Agarwal. (2017); EFFECT OF SNAGS TECHNIQUE ON HEART RATE AMONG PATIENTS WITH UPPER CERVICAL DYSFUNCTION. Int. J. of Adv. Res. 5 (8). 749-752] (ISSN 2320-5407). www.journalijar.com


Dr. Parul Raj Agarwal
Associate Professor Department of Physiotherapy, Sardar Bhagwan Singh Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Research HNB Garhwal University, Dehradun

DOI:


Article DOI: 10.21474/IJAR01/5115       DOI URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.21474/IJAR01/5115


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