01Mar 2019

RELATIONSHIP OF HEAVY METAL IN DIABETES AND NON-DIABETIC FOOT ULCER PATIENTS.

  • KPC Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata.
  • Ramakrishna Mission SevaPratishthan, Kolkata.
  • Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, A.J.C. Bose Road, Kolkata-700020, West Bengal, India.
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Diabetic foot ulcer is a major complication of diabetes mellitus, and probably the major component of the diabetic foot. The aim of our study was to find out any relationship of heavy metals like Arsenic, Cadmium, Mercury, Lead, Chromium, Barium, Cobalt, Caesium We found that mean arsenic of Type2 DM with Foot Ulcer patients had significantly higher than others. Mean cadmium level had significantly lower in Type2 DM with Foot Ulcer than Healthy Control (t=3.5689). It may conclude that mercury level had lower in diabetic patients. Mean lead level had significantly higher in Type2 DM with Foot Ulcer than Healthy Control (t=2.3510). T-test showed that mean lead of Type2 DM with Foot Ulcer patients had significantly higher than others. Mean chromium level had significantly higher in Type2 DM with Foot Ulcer than others but that was not statistically significant. T-test showed that mean barium of Type2 DM without foot ulcer patients had significantly higher than others. Mean cobalt, caesium and selenium level had significantly higher in Type2 DM with Foot Ulcer than others but that was not statistically significant. It can be suggested that toxic metals such as arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, chromium, barium, cobalt, caesium and selenium may have a role to induce foot ulcer in diabetic subjects.


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[Prasanta Kumar Bhattacharyya,Priyanka Biswas, Debarshi Jana, Jayanta Ranjan Mukherjee and Madhusanta De. (2019); RELATIONSHIP OF HEAVY METAL IN DIABETES AND NON-DIABETIC FOOT ULCER PATIENTS. Int. J. of Adv. Res. 7 (3). 126-133] (ISSN 2320-5407). www.journalijar.com


Dr. Debarshi Jana
Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, A.J.C. Bose Road, Kolkata-700020, West Bengal, India

DOI:


Article DOI: 10.21474/IJAR01/8610       DOI URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.21474/IJAR01/8610


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