20Jan 2017

FAMILY ENTREPRENEURIAL BUSINESSES AND NEW VENTURES: FORMATION, CHALLENGES, BEHAVIOR, RELATIONSHIP.

  • Master of science in Entrepreneurship, Tehran University, Iran
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New ventures are frequently started by entrepreneurial teams rather than lone entrepreneurs. Often, team members have family ties. In this research to study the formation and membership of the team, team challenges, behavior and performance of the team, successors of business and family relationships between members of the team. Combined, they suggest that relationships are more important than skill diversity in determining the effectiveness of both family business and new venture teams


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[Mohsen Babaei, Reza Abedi and Masoud Safizadeh (2017); FAMILY ENTREPRENEURIAL BUSINESSES AND NEW VENTURES: FORMATION, CHALLENGES, BEHAVIOR, RELATIONSHIP. Int. J. of Adv. Res. 5 (1). 29-47] (ISSN 2320-5407). www.journalijar.com


Reza Abedi


DOI:


Article DOI: 10.21474/IJAR01/2717       DOI URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.21474/IJAR01/2717


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