25Mar 2017

HAEMONCHUS CONTORTUS AND OVINE HOST: A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW.

  • National Animal Protozoa Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China.
  • Faculty of Science, Kafr El-Sheikh University, Kafr El-Sheikh, Egypt.
  • College of Science and Arts in Unaizah, Qassim University, Unaizah, Saudi Arabia.
  • College of Applied Health Sciences in Ar Rass, Qassim University, Ar Rass 51921, Saudi Arabia.
  • College of information science and technology, Beijing normal university, Beijing, china.
  • Department of Computer Science and Information Technology, University of Management Sciences and Information Technology, Kotli Azad Kashmir, 11100, Pakistan
  • State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Key Laboratory of Development of Veterinary Products, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, Hubei,China.
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Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infections are a world-wide problem for both small- and large-scale farmers. Infection by GI parasites in ruminants, including sheep and goat can result in harsh economic losses in a variety of ways: reproductive inefficiency, decreased work capacity, involuntary culling, diminished food intake, poor animal growth rates and lower weight gains, treatment and management costs, and mortality in heavily parasitized animals. Among the GI parasites that cause losses to the farming industry, the barber’s pole worm Haemonchus contortus is the predominant, blood- sucking, highly pathogenic, and economically important nematode that infects small ruminants. Here, we review the historical and recent literature on the ovine-parasite-environment interaction for H. contortus to bring avenues where advances in the understanding of these interactions is an indispensible to develop a cost effective control strategies as potential options for the haemonchosis control in sheep and the proper management of sheep in various production systems.


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[Saeed El-Ashram, Ibrahim Al Nasr, Rashid mehmood, Min Hu, Li He, Xun Suo (2017); HAEMONCHUS CONTORTUS AND OVINE HOST: A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW. Int. J. of Adv. Res. 5 (Mar). 972-999] (ISSN 2320-5407). www.journalijar.com


Saeed El-Ashram1
Faculty of Science, Kafr El-Sheikh University, Kafr El-Sheikh, Egypt

DOI:


Article DOI: 10.21474/IJAR01/3597       DOI URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.21474/IJAR01/3597


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